Editorial Article: 8 Big Life Sciences Stories That Got Scientists Talking Last Month

From cancer biosimilars to AI PCR & the technologies making gene therapy a reality, discover the top trending content that caught the attention of SelectScience readers in April 2019

07 May 2019


 

1. Cancer biosimilars are one of the most rapidly expanding fields in pharma, and these scientists in Glasgow are working to accelerate their discovery with advanced flow cytometry.

 

 

 

 

2. Researchers at Oslo University have identified a novel target for glioblastoma therapy, which could prevent cancer cell invasion into the surrounding brain tissue.

 

 

 

 

3. The world’s first AI-powered PCR platform has been launched by Thermo Fisher Scientific. The RFID-enabled technology can respond to voice commands and conduct facial authentication.

 

 

 

4. Gene therapy could be quickly becoming a reality with a new, dissolvable microcarrier platform for large-scale AAV manufacture. In a fascinating panel discussion, three scientists explain how and why this technology is potentially paradigm-changing.

 

 

 

5.  A collaborative effort between scientists in Korea and Tomocube has achieved 4D analysis of immune-cancer cell interactions during immunotherapy, providing new insight into single-cell dynamics at the junction between immunology and cancer biology.

 

 

 

6. Dr. Benjamin Freedman was the first scientist in the western hemisphere to generate a kidney organoid from pluripotent stem cells and, in an exclusive interview, he reports on how this eureka moment has since shaped the face of kidney research.

 

 

 

7. Nanomaterials are set to revolutionize medicine, among other scientific fields, but the nano-inflammation group at the University of Manchester is investigating how graphene oxide and other 2D materials could potentially cause harm to human health.

 

 

 

8. MIMETAS, a leading organ-on-a-chip company, has unveiled the first platform to enable vascularization of complex 3D tissues in vitro – providing even greater physiological relevance to pre-clinical models of disease.

 

 

 

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