The Open Source Microscope Concept in Theory and Practice
20 Jun 2013

The speed at which life science microscopy applications are currently evolving requires equipment able to match the pace. As the number of tasks required by microscope systems ever-increases, scientists have a real need for equipment flexibility.

This webinar presents a new open source concept to microscopy, which enables microscopists to effortlessly mould their imaging system to wide-ranging application needs.

Prof. Sarah Köster, Research Group Leader at the University of Göttingen and Wolfgang Hempell, Section Manager at Olympus Europe, will demonstrate how open source frames can be easily modified for even the most high-end set-ups, such as fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

Key learning objectives:
• Single wavelength FCCS for in-situ studies of molecular assembly.
• Infinite light path, the gateway to modify observation methods of microscopes.
• Open source microscopy, making the infinite light path accessible to every researcher.

OLYMPUS EUROPA SE & CO. KG



Show    per page
1 of 10 Page     1 2 3  ... Next 
A new approach to improving early characterization of therapeutic formulations - Viscosizer 2005 Sep 2014Read
An introduction to capillary rheometry - Evaluating material properties under process relevant conditions5 Sep 2014Read
Speed your way though your protein formulation screening by automating your measurements5 Sep 2014Read
Novel analytical technologies for product deformulation - Part 25 Sep 2014Read
Water treatment - Optimize coagulant dosing using zeta potential5 Sep 2014Read
Applications of rheology in the waxes, creams and emulsions arena5 Sep 2014Read
Avoiding Bottlenecks When Validating Your Laboratory Instrument and Information Systems20 Aug 2014Read
A New Concept in Metabolic Studies: How Personalized 'Sportomics' Bridges Bench and Clinical Science24 Jul 2014Read
Process development and optimisation using ambr250™ for mammalian and microbial processes2 Jul 2014Read
Why does ice cream taste smooth or gritty? It depends on the rheology!30 Jun 2014Read