Blotting Techniques Enhanced by the use of Type I Ultrapure Water
24 Nov 2014

Northern, Southern and Western blotting techniques depend on the use of Type I ultrapure water to obtain high quality results. Water used for blotting purposes should be nuclease-, endotoxin- and bacteria-free to protect the DNA, RNA and proteins under investigation. This application note demonstrates how ultrapure water should be used for the preparation of samples, buffers, reagents, gels and rinsing solutions.

Show    per page
1 of 3     Page  1 2 3 Next 
Detection and Quantitation of Protein with ScanLater Western Blot Detection System protein quantitation, blotting20 Nov 2014Read
Western Blot and In-Cell Western™ Assay Detection Using IRDye® Subclass Specific Antibodies monoclonal antibodies4 Nov 2014Read
Imaging Chemiluminescence by Scanning Using the C-DiGit® Chemiluminescent Western Blot Scanner chemiluminescence, blotting31 Oct 2014Read
Near-Infrared (NIR) Western Blot Detection with the Odyssey Family Imaging Systems quantitative analyses, blotting29 Oct 2014Read
Detection of Post-Immunoprecipitation Proteins by Western Blot Using the Quick Western Kit–IRDye® 680RD protein analysis, immunoprecipitation, blotting27 Oct 2014Read
Good Westerns Gone Bad: Tips to Make Your NIR Western Blot Great24 Oct 2014Read
Antibody Recovery and Reuse in the SNAP i.d.® 2.0 Immunodetection System immunoassay, primary antibodies, blotting22 Oct 2014Read
Sensitivity and Protein-to-Protein Consistency of Flamingo™ Fluorescent Gel Stain Compared to Other Fluorescent Stains fluorescence, gel imaging, protein analysis1 Oct 2014Read
Chemiluminescent and Fluorescent Westerns: Choose the Best Assay for Your Experiment protein analysis, blotting29 Sep 2014Read
Quantitative Fluorescence Western Blot Using Amersham™ WB System protein quantitation, blotting24 Sep 2014Read

Popular tags in SelectScience