Amersham™ Protran Nitrocellulose Membranes

Amersham™ Protran Nitrocellulose Membranes
by GE Healthcare


Amersham Protran™ (formally Whatman Protran) nitrocellulose (NC) membranes are the most frequently specified transfer media in the world for a wide range of applications. Protran membranes are manufactured using 100% pure nitrocellulose to ensure the highest binding capacity possible. Protran membranes have the best handling strength of all pure nitrocellulose membranes. They are compatible w...read more

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Description

 

Amersham Protran™ (formally Whatman Protran) nitrocellulose (NC) membranes are the most frequently specified transfer media in the world for a wide range of applications. Protran membranes are manufactured using 100% pure nitrocellulose to ensure the highest binding capacity possible.

Protran membranes have the best handling strength of all pure nitrocellulose membranes. They are compatible with a variety of detection methods, including isotopic, chemiluminescent (luminol-based), colorimetric, and fluorescent.

Unlike PVDF membranes, Protran nitrocellulose does not require a methanol prewetting step. This makes Protran the membrane of choice for proteins which prefer aqueous environments.

Amersham™ Protran Nitrocellulose Membranes Features:

  • High binding, low background - The superior surface properties of the membrane guarantee superior signal-to-noise ratios, without the need for stringent washing conditions.
  • High retention of small proteins - high surface area, ensuring binding of small proteins below 20 kD by reducing ‘blow-through’.
  • Protran blotting sandwiches - A precut nitrocellulose membrane and 2 sheets of 3MM Chr blotting paper are prepackaged into a sandwich to help save time.

Product Overview

Amersham™ Protran Nitrocellulose Membranes by GE Healthcare
Amersham™ Protran Nitrocellulose Membranes

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